Friday, March 27, 2015

March Patient of the Month_ Cooper!!!

     Cooper, a 5 month old male Boston Terrier was brought in one  Sunday last month because he was simply having a lousy day. For 24 hours he was not behaving like a puppy, he was lethargic and not interest ineating. His parents knew something was wrong.
   One of our First Year Associates, Dr. Peress examined Cooper and it became very clear that Cooper was not well. X-rays showed his lungs had fluid building up in his chest cavity and consolidation of a lung lobe; all originating from a variety of possibilities but all potentially life threatening.  An initial aspirate of the fluid in his chest showed pus and was sent out for more detailed testing.
     At this time, it was suspected that Cooper had pneumonia and a pyothorax.  A pyothorax is the accumulation of puss in the chest cavity due to an infection.  Cooper was immediately hospitalized under intensive care in our oxygen therapy chamber and given intravenous medication and fluids throughout the night.
    In the morning Dr. Peress transferred Cooper’s case to Dr. Heim who placed Cooper under anesthesia to insert a chest tube. This delicate procedure was complicated by Cooper’s poor lung quality but necessary to remove the pus from his chest as the accumulation of fluid around the lungs is life threatening.   
    For three days, Cooper received antibiotics and nebulizations to address the pneumonia, and chest lavages to wash out the fluid that was accumulating in his chest cavity.  While his attitude and appetite improved and his bloodwork was getting better, the fluid in his lungs was not resolving and his pneumonia was worsening. The laboratory test results of the fluid taken from his chest at his initial visit returned as e coli. It was time to do more.
     Dr. Heim recommended Cooper get a CT scan to more fully visualize the origin of his illness. Fortunately, Mobile Pet Imaginga new mobile service in the area offered to perform a free CT for Cooper's to introduce their services to our practice. While this diagnostic test was a risk for Cooper’s health because he must be under full anesthesia throughout, it would provide the most efficient diagnosis of cause. His owner consented.
   The CT scan showed Copper’s right middle lung lobe was abscessed. An explorative thoracotomy, was recommended with removal of the right middle lung lobe. Drs. Heim and Herrington performed the procedure and Cooper handle the anesthesia well. 
    After surgery Cooper improved dramatically. The chest tubes were removed and he was sent home a few days later. The damaged lung lobe was sent for pathology and confirmed the abscess. His prescribed antibiotic were both powerful and effective and he has made a full recovery.
     Since his discharge Cooper  has returned for suture removal and vaccinations. He is living the good life, like all puppies should. We are so pleased to be able to share his success story.


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

2015 Free Eye Exams for Service Animals throughout May!!!!



VCA HollywoodAnimal Hospital and Animal Eye Guys, in conjunction with the American College of Veterinarian Ophthalmologist will offer free eye exams to all service animals throughout the month of May.

To maximize our availability we are dedicating one full day, May 17, 2015, to these loyal service animals. Guardians and handlers of all qualified service animals are invited to visit the clinic on May 17th for a free eye exam provided by Dr. Robert Swinger, D.V.M., Diplomate of the American College ofVeterinary Ophthalmologist. 

When: The month of  May!!
http://www.acvoeyeexam.org/2015/animals/qualifications.shtmlWhere: VCA Hollywood Animal Hospital &
 Animal Eye Guys of S. Florida
How: Register online until April 30th

Dr Swinger will be checking for problems including redness, squinting, cloudy corneas, retinal disease, early cataracts and other serious abnormalities. Early detection and treatment is vital to these working animals.
  "It is truly an honor to provide exams for animals that so selflessly provide support to their people and communities."     -  Dr. Swinger
To qualify, animals must be active working animals such as guide dogs, handicapped assistance animals, detection dogs, therapy animals, and search and rescue dogs that have been certified by a formal training program/organization or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The certifying organization can be national, regional or local in nature. 

http://www.acvoeyeexam.org/2015/animals/qualifications.shtmlOwners/agents for the animal(s) must first register the animal via an online registration through April 30th.  

Once registered, owner/agent will receive a registration number. Simply call (954) 826-8871 with that number to make an appointment in May.
 
“Our practice has been serving this community for over 67 years. We could not be happier to partner with Dr. Swinger and once again provide this service.”
 Dr. James Herrington l Medical Director l VCAHAH






March Team Member of the Month- Karlyne

Many of you may see this face and immediately recognize her for her many years of service to the VCAHAH. If so, then you will also be reminded of the years we were without her.  Thankfully, though Karlyne has returned to our animal house and somehow all seems right again.

When Karlyne began working at the VCAHAH, now almost 10 years ago, she began by learning the ropes as a Veterinarian Assistant (VA).  She was a star employee who quickly rose through the ranks and was asked to be VA team leader. This role was perfect for her, she was a star. However, when family called, Karlyne had to answer and for several years she shared her talents elsewhere.

Since her return, Karlyne has fallen right back into her role as a leader. She exudes positivity and the staff gravitates to her whenever in need of a helping hand. She can always be counted on to get the job done, not only with 'lightening speed' but with a critical eye on perfection.

She fits in well with our family and "has the patience of a saint- both with our patients and staff!"
She is a true asset to our practice and to our team. We are thrilled she is back and happy to recognize her as our March Team Member of the Month!

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

March Patient of the Month- Cooper!!!!!



Cooper, a 5 month old male Boston Terrier was brought in one  Sunday last month because he was simply having a lousy day. For 24 hours he was not behaving like a puppy, he was lethargic and not interest ineating. His parents knew something was wrong.

One of our First Year Associates, Dr. Peress examined Cooper and it became very clear that Cooper was not well. X-rays showed his lungs had fluid building up in his chest cavity and consolidation of a lung lobe; all originating from a variety of possibilities but all potentially life threatening.  An initial aspirate of the fluid in his chest showed pus and was sent out for more detailed testing.

At this time, it was suspected that Cooper had pneumonia and a pyothorax.  A pyothorax is the accumulation of puss in the chest cavity due to an infection.  Cooper was immediately hospitalized under intensive care in our oxygen therapy chamber and given intravenous medication and fluids throughout the night.

 In the morning Dr. Peress transferred Cooper’s case to Dr. Heim who placed Cooper under anesthesia to insert a chest tube. This delicate procedure was complicated by Cooper’s poor lung quality but necessary to remove the pus from his chest as the accumulation of fluid around the lungs is life threatening.   

For three days, Cooper received antibiotics and nebulizations to address the pneumonia, and chest lavages to wash out the fluid that was accumulating in his chest cavity.  While his attitude and appetite improved and his bloodwork was getting better, the fluid in his lungs was not resolving and his pneumonia was worsening. The laboratory test results of the fluid taken from his chest at his initial visit returned as e coli. It was time to do more.

 Dr. Heim recommended Cooper get a CT scan to more fully visualize the origin of his illness. Fortunately, Mobile Pet Imaginga new mobile service in the area offered to perform a free CT for Cooper's to introduce their services to our practice. While this diagnostic test was a risk for Cooper’s health because he must be under full anesthesia throughout, it would provide the most efficient diagnosis of cause. His owner consented.

The CT scan showed Copper’s right middle lung lobe was abscessed. An explorative thoracotomy, was recommended with removal of the right middle lung lobe. Drs. Heim and Herrington performed the procedure and Cooper handle the anesthesia well. 

After surgery Cooper improved dramatically. The chest tubes were removed and he was sent home a few days later. The damaged lung lobe was sent for pathology and confirmed the abscess. His prescribed antibiotic were both powerful and effective and he has made a full recovery.

Since his discharge Cooper  has returned for suture removal and vaccinations. He is living the good life, like all puppies should. We are so pleased to be able to share his success story.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Grateful Paws Dog & Cat Rescue's 5th Annual Fundraising Event


Grateful Paws Dog & Cat Rescue’s annual fundraising event helps keep them afloat for the year. It allows them to provide food and medical care for all of the pets they care for. Some of the pets are adopted right away, while many of them are there long-term.
Bring your family and friends and enjoy a day full of fun, while helping to provide care for pets in our community that are in need.

We appreciate all of your love and support, and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends at this great fundraising event!

WHEN: Wednesday, March 18th

WHERE: ALIBI in Wilton Manors

WHY: To help provide food and medical care for pets in need.

**FREE ADMISSION-- except for the VIP Party at 6pm**
VIP 6pm - 8pm -- $20 at the door
(Includes: Cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, and an advanced viewing of the Silent Auction prizes with a chance to "Buy it Now")

CASH BAR SPECIAL: Happy Hour prices until 9pm. -The food is great - and there is seating inside and outside.

SHOWTIME at 9pm:  Dame Edna, Nikki Adams, Lenora Jay, Jennifer McClain, and many more

SILENT AUCTION GREAT PRIZES: Doggy Baskets, Cat basket, Pet Portrait, Weekend at the Beach, and Liquor baskets

50/50 RAFFLE: Unless you can have someone to hold your ticket stub, winner must be present. Winner receives half of the pot **Last year it was like $500!!

RAFFLE TICKET CRUISE-- Raffle ticket for a Holland America Cruise. (Winner does not need to be present, as long as we can read the name and contact information.)

Holland America Cruise for TWO, 8 days/7 nights, ocean-view
accommodation.  The value is $5,500.  No expiration date.
Winner decides on one of these destinations:  Alaska, Caribbean, Mexico, or New England & Canada.

Holland America Cruise Ticket Cost: $20 --Fewer than 300 tickets have been sold, so the chances of winning are better than excellent. The winner will be announced on
Wednesday night.

Thank you for all of your support! Hope to see you there!!


Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Reasons To Act More Like Your Pet

Pets aren't always easy to take care of, and they often require a substantial time commitment (something you’re all too aware of at, say, 3 a.m., when Bing Clawsby is finally ready to go outside and do his business). But pets provide an amazing return on that time investment, especially when it comes to your health. Case in point: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pet owners tend to have lower blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels than non-pet owners. But that’s not all. Pets also model many surprisingly healthy behaviors that humans would do well to emulate. Here are just a few, according to veterinarians, dog trainers, and other pet experts. 


1. They focus on what matters most. You may get grumpy after a bad day at the office, but your pooch never does. “Companion animals mostly care about food, love, and shelter (not always in that order). As long as they have those things, they don’t need much else,” Mary Gardner, DVM, a veterinarian and cofounder of Lap of Love Veterinary Hospice tells Yahoo Health. “Pets also don’t complain much at all. People believe they hide their pain; I simply think they manage it differently.” If humans could model these behaviors, Gardner adds, we’d be healthier, happier, “and more people would want to be around us.” 

2. They practice portion control (even if not by choice). Snowball might not want to limit her kibble intake any more than you want to limit your tortilla-chip intake. Nonetheless, she typically eats reasonably sized helpings of nutritionally balanced food — and never gets to eat straight out of the bag. Follow her lead. “Both animals and people need structure and regulation when it comes to portion size,” says Jme Thomas, executive director of Motley Zoo Animal Rescue based in Redmond, Washington. 

3. They know how to de-stress. Your pooch doesn’t pour a glass of cabernet when the going gets rough (though, yes, it would make a very popular YouTube video if she did). She may, however, start begging for a walk or to play a game. Smart dog! “Actively seeking healthy activities — that function as de-stressors when stress levels are high — helps to reset people as well as dogs, and bring us back to a productive and functional status, from which many things feel a lot more ‘do-able,’” Marisa Scully, a certified dog behavior specialist in Philadelphia, tells Yahoo Health. 


4. They hit the hay. People don’t get enough sleep: According to a 2014 survey by the National Sleep Foundation, 45 percent of Americans said that a lack of sleep had impaired their activities at least once in the previous week. Learn from your cat or dog, who knows just how important it is to get enough shut-eye, says Jeff Werber, VVM, president and chief veterinarian of Century Veterinary Group in Los Angeles. “Whether it’s a lazy dog day afternoon, or a quick cat nap, you won’t find them burning the candles at both ends.” 5. They stretch! There’s a reason one of the most common yoga moves is named downward dog. Dogs (and cats) stretch constantly — and we should do the same, notes certified dog behavior consultant Russell Hartstein. Why? Stretching can improve flexibility and reduce your risk of injury. 

6. They’re open to new things. Animals are naturally curious. “Open a box or empty a bag and before you know it, your cat will have climbed in to investigate. Walk your dog past a gardener planting flowers and chances are she will check it out before moving on,” Werber says. “And they’re always up for some fun. A game of catch, a walk, a visit — bring it on.” Since research has found that seeking out new experiences can keep people feeling young and healthy, we’d do well to follow suit.

7. They’re comfortable getting zen. Numerous studies have found a correlation between mindful meditation and reduced stress, decreased heart disease, and a stronger immune response — and that’s something your cat already knows how to do instinctively. “Each morning I sit on the sofa with my cat, Turtle, while I drink my first cup of coffee,” says Kristen Levine, a pet living expert. “We spend about 10 minutes together, her getting neck and head rubs, me enjoying her purring and having a few meditative moments at the start of the day.It sounds simple, and it can be, but depending on the activity, it can have a powerfully relaxing or invigorating effect for both human and critter.”